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February 22 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “To Combat Climate Change, Human Activities More Important Than Natural Feedbacks” • Scientists at the University of Rochester studied methane emissions from a period in Earth’s history partly analogous to the warming of Earth today. Their research, published in Science, suggests human caused emissions are of greatest concern. [University of Rochester]

Drilling ice cores (Vasilii Petrenko | University of Rochester)

  • “Climate Change Is Drying Up The Colorado River, Putting Millions At Risk Of ‘Severe Water Shortages'” • The Colorado River – which provides water to more than 40 million people from Denver to Los Angeles – has seen its flow dwindle by 20% compared to the last century, and scientists have found that climate change is mainly to blame. [CNN]
  • “Climate Change May Doom 1 In 3 Species Of Plants And Animals In The Next 50 Years” • Using data from surveys that studied 538 animals, insects and plants from 581 sites across the globe, researchers from the University of Arizona found that approximately one in three plant, insect, and animal species could face extinction by 2070. [CNN]
  • “Tesla’s Helping Australian Bushfire Victims” • Tesla is helping Australian bushfire victims, along with 5B, a solar provider in Sydney, and Mike Cannon-Brooks, the founder of Atlassian. The goal is to install solar panels and batteries in towns that have lost power completely due to the devastating bushfires of 2019 to 2020. [CleanTechnica]
  • “Cuomo Announces Efforts To Speed Up Green Energy Projects” • New York Gov Andrew M. Cuomo announced he is advancing a budget amendment to ramp up the permitting and construction of green projects, as part of the state’s commitment to obtain 70% of energy from renewable sources by the end of the decade. [Albany Times Union]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

February 21 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “New Prefab Homes Never Need To Be Connected To The Grid” • Dvele, a prefabricated home manufacturer based in Southern California, announced that from now on, every home it makes will produce its own electricity using solar PVs and have a built-in battery storage system, eliminating the need to connect to the electrical grid. [CleanTechnica]

Dvele prefabricated home (Dvele image)

  • “Renewable Energy Could Power The World By 2050” • By mid-century, virtually all the world’s demand for electricity could be met by renewable energy. This is the consensus of 47 peer-reviewed research papers from 13 independent groups with a total of 91 authors that have been brought together by Stanford University in California. [Eco-Business]
  • “FERC Excludes Clean Energy From NY’s Capacity Market” • A decision applying buyer-side mitigation to state-supported resources that participate in New York’s wholesale capacity market is the latest attempt by a hyper-politicized Trump FERC to try and pose barriers to deployment of clean energy resources by the states. [Natural Resources Defense Council]
  • “Seasonal Pumped Hydropower Storage Could Solve The Renewable Energy Storage Challenge” • Seasonal pumped hydropower storage, an established technology, could be an affordable and sustainable solution to store energy and water on an annual scale, according to IIASA research published in the journal Nature Communications. [SciTechDaily]
  • “American Farmers Are Turning To Wind Energy” • Farmers have seen prices for commodities like corn, soybeans, milk, and meat down since 2013 due to technology and globalization. Extreme weather from climate change made things worse. The trade war with China has hit them hard. But a new crop may save them. It is windpower. [CleanTechnica]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

Climate Advocates Bennington

Monadnock Food Co-op Hosts CSA Farm Fair

A free Monadnock Region CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) Fair will take place at the Monadnock Food Co-op cafe on Sunday, March 8, 2020, from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Seven area CSA farmers will set up informational tables and answer questions about their farms and CSA memberships.

Although each local CSA farm is unique and individually run, each offers “shares” of locally grown food to community members. There are variations in the price, share size, distribution, choices, pick-up sites, payment plans, and variety of food offered. Some CSA farms concentrate on vegetable production, while others provide eggs, meat, flowers, berries, maple syrup, honey, raw milk, cheese, yogurt, or other local products.
The commitment from community members to join a CSA implies a willingness to share with the farmer both the rewards and risks of small-scale farming. Weather, pest damage, and crop failures affect both the farmer and the shareholder. The entire community absorbs the costs of raising food in sustainable ways, and farmers receive consistent appreciation and financial support for their efforts. The shareholders know when, where, and how their food is grown.
A CSA membership supports local farms and the local economy, eliminating many of the environmental and food quality costs of marketing, packaging, and shipping food long distances. Freshly picked, locally grown fruits and vegetables are a good value because they have superior flavor compared to many large-scale commercially raised crops. Sustainable farm practices also avoid the hidden costs of pesticide residues, soil erosion, and polluted surface groundwater often associated with large scale conventional agriculture.
“Local farmland in CSA use becomes healthier through crop rotation, composting, cover crops, natural fertilizers, and periodic resting,” said Frank Hunter of Hillside Springs Farm. “Small farms are also able to grow heirloom or little-known varieties of fruits and vegetables, which helps maintain the diversity and vitality of the world’s seed bank, and also puts healthy and delicious food on the table!”
This year’s Monadnock Region CSA Fair participants:
Abenaki Springs Farm in Walpole offers berries, herbs, and vegetables in rotational production; uses biodynamic principles and remineralizes the soil: 603-209-7100, abenakispringsfarm.com, info@abenakispringsfarm.com.
 
Hillside Springs Farm and CSA Garden, a hand and horse-powered farm in Westmoreland, offers vegetables, herbs, apple cider, and cutting flowers, all grown using only organic and biodynamic methods. Full and Half shares available on the farm or in Keene: 603-399-7288.  hillsidespringsfarm.com, hillsidespringsfarm@gmail.com.
 
Seven Generations Farm in Gilsum is a small scale herbal farm and homestead, practicing permaculture and herbalism. Offers a bi-monthly Full Moon Herb Share. Each share includes a variety of apothecary items and medicinal plant products. Half and Full shares are available: sevengenerationsfarm.com, sevengenerationsfarm@gmail.com.
 
Picadilly Farm in Winchester grows certified organic produce. Various types of CSA shares are available June-December, with share pick up at the farm or in Keene or Brattleboro: 603-239-8718, picadillyfarm.com, jenny@picadillyfarm.com.
 
Sun Moon Farm in Rindge provides vegetables, herbs, and cut flowers to members from June to November and grows a variety of greens all winter long. Located at “The Meeting School,” a property that has been continuously farmed since 1783, the farm grows over 75 varieties of old and rare Dahlias and offers members artisan breads that are baked on the property: 603-899-2806, sunmoonfarm.org, sun.moon.craig@gmail.com.
Tracie’s Community Farm in Fitzwilliam offers spring, summer, and fall CSA shares in a variety of sizes and with the option of home delivery to Keene and the surrounding areas. Shares are harvested, washed, and packed day of delivery, and include a large variety of ripe, in-season produce: Jack Rixey, 443-994-4629; traciesfarm.com, farmers@traciesfarm.com.
Village Roots Permaculture Farm in East Alstead offers spring and fall season greens and poultry shares. All birds are raised on pasture and fed only organic grains. Breeds include Freedom Ranger broiler chickens and heritage Narragansett turkeys: 603-477-5533, villageroots.orgmarty@theorchardschool.org.
View event updates at monadnockfood.coop/event/csa/.

February 20 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Climate Crisis Is Coming For The Tidal Basin In DC” • The Jefferson Memorial in Washington, DC overlooks the Tidal Basin, a man-made body of water surrounded by cherry trees. Visitors who stroll along the water’s edge, gazing up at the stately monument, are forced off parts of the path by water. The land is sinking, but the seas are rising, too. [EcoWatch]

Tidal Basin in Spring (Andrew Bossi | Wikimedia Commons)

  • “Bushfire Royal Commission To Look At Mitigation But Not Climate Change” • Prime Minister Scott Morrison released letters patent establishing a national inquiry into bushfires. It is to examine powers of Australia’s government to call out the military, national standards for hazard reduction, and disaster mitigation, but not climate change. [The Guardian]
  • “Climate Change Could Kill All Of Earth’s Coral Reefs By 2100, Scientists Warn” • Climate change could destroy almost all of Earth’s coral reef habitats by 2100, University of Hawaii Manoa reported. And about 70-90% of all coral reefs are expected to disappear in the next 20 years due to warming oceans, acidic water, and pollution. [CNN]
  • “Oil And Gas Production Is Contributing Even More To Global Warming Than Was Thought, Study Finds” • study finds that methane emissions from fossil fuels are between 25% and 40% larger than past research had estimated, revealing that oil and gas production is contributing far more to warming the planet than previously thought. [CNN]
  • “Bloomberg, Apparent Climate Champion, Defends Fossil Fuel In His First Debate” • Billionaire Michael Bloomberg spoke in his first debate as a 2020 presidential candidate. The former New York City mayor defended fossil fuels and pitched what’s widely considered the lowest baseline for any federal response to global warming. [HuffPost]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

NY: Climate Action Film Festival

VT Action Alert: Support Local Renewables TODAY!

Dear Friends,

We need your quick help to propel climate solutions and lower energy costs in Vermont.

Click here and in less than one minute, you can send a free postcard to your legislators and the Governor sharing your support for local renewable energy and resiliency in Vermont and urging them to take meaningful local action.

We know that large majorities of Vermonters support clean energy and action to address climate change. 76% of Vermonters support requiring Vermont’s utilities to get 100% of their electricity from renewable sources by 2030. 73% support ‘significantly’ increasing the requirement for in-state renewables, but legislators and the Governor need to hear directly from you about your support. See more results here.

This week S.267, the legislation that would achieve more local renewables and a 100% Renewable Energy Standard is up for a vote.

You can help TODAY by letting your legislators know that you support S.267. 

Please take a minute (literally!) to send a FREE postcard to your representatives letting them know you support local renewables.

Together, we can make a difference in the climate fight!

February 19 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Vassar College to buy renewable energy” • In Poughkeepsie, New York, Vassar College has announced an agreement with its energy provider to purchase electricity generated solely by renewable sources. The new contract with the energy supplier, EDF Energy, is effective in July 2021. Vassar’s goal us to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030. [Mid-Hudson News]

Vassar Collage (Photo: Vassar Collage)

  • “Senators Consider Requiring Utilities To Buy More Local Renewables” • A proposal discussed by the Vermont Senate Finance Committee, S 267, would require utilities to buy 100% renewable electricity by 2030. And 20% of that would have to come from smaller, in-state sources – double the amount currently required by law. [vtdigger.org]
  • “Tesla Shanghai Model 3 May Go Cobalt-Free Using CATL’s LFP Cells – Diving Deeper” • Tesla is in talks with battery producer CATL to supply lithium-iron-phosphate (LFP) cells for the Shanghai-made Tesla Model 3, Reuters reported. LFP cells are relatively cheap, simple to package, and require no scarce minerals (cobalt and nickel). [CleanTechnica]
  • “105 Cities Have Made The Global CDP 2019 ‘A’ List For Climate Action” • Cities around the world are standing up to lead in the fight on climate change, according to CDP. While reporting cities that scored an “A” in the 2019 rankings are clustered in Europe and North America, every populated continent has cities that are taking action. [CleanTechnica]
  • “New Renewable Device To Generate Electricity From Moisture In The Air” • A team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst developed a device that uses a natural protein to create electricity from moisture in the air. The findings, published in the journal Nature, could have significant implications for the future of renewable energy. [The Weather Channel]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

Alberto Lamadrid – Thursday!

“Resilience and response to high impact events: From energy system operators to households”

Alberto J. Lamadrid, Lehigh University

 

Thursday, February 20

5:00-6:00 pm

Steele 006 – Dartmouth College

 Increased incidence of extreme events and socio-economic losses due to power outages create a fundamental concern for operators and planners to rapidly restore the power system. Also, extreme events cause populations to face the decision to evacuate more often. These two intertwined problems will be discussed.

 https://envs.dartmouth.edu/news/2020/01/alberto-j-lamadrid-lehigh-university-february-20

 Sponsored by the Arthur L. Irving Institute for Energy and Society and the Environmental Studies Program at Dartmouth College

 Free and open to the public

The Future of Heat & $1/2 Billion Are on the Table

New York’s PSC allocated $454 million on Jan.16 for heat pumps in an effort to reduce climate destabilizing greenhouse gases in the heating sector. Come learn what all the fuss is about !

Join us for the sixth annual NY-GEO Renewable Heating & Cooling Conference at the Albany Wolf Road Marriott Hotel on March 25th & 26th, 2020 as we grapple with how to turn NY’s investment into a nation-leading success story.
Be part of a fantastic program that will help policy makers, installers, organizers, architects, clean energy activists, contractors, building owners and managers, engineers and more to plug into the renewable heat momentum building in New York and across the northeast! Workshops this year will be expanded to include air source as well as ground source heat pumps, and to focus on policies and initiatives that are common to both technologies.
Early discounts available on registrations until midnight, Monday, February 28.
For Building Professionals, NY-GEO 2020 will provide continuing education credits for building professionals, including IGSHPA, BPI, AIA (for architects) LEED (self reporting) and NYSPE credits for engineers.
We are excited to announce that NYSERDA President and CEO Alicia Barton has confirmed as a keynote speaker for the conference.
Thanks to all who have already registered ! Why not forward this note to your colleagues and encourage them to join you at NY-GEO 2020 ?
Become a 2020 member of NY-GEO and get a 10% discount on registration exhibition space and a $100 discount on a sponsorship or exhibit. Associate non-voting memberships in NY-GEO are available for only $35 and bring a 5% registration discount.
This year PSEG Long Island, the Sierra Club Atlantic Chapter, Orange & Rockland Utilities and Con Edison NY are providing scholarship funds for students and low income individuals. Email nygeoinfo@gmail.com if you will attend but need a scholarship to pay part of your registration. We want you to attend and will happily share the cost with you, thanks to our scholarship sponsors, but scholarship funds are limited so let us know as soon as possible.